A thin shim of OD styrene was cemented over the edge of the fuselage to provide a dark surface for the mating of the clear nose piece, Fig. 25.  The completed nose conversion after initial shaping and scribing, Fig. 26.  The clear acrylic has been polished out.  Thin styrene was used to form the raised panels, Fig. 27.  The mounting for the D/F bullet was fabricated from styrene along with brass hinges and latch for the cockpit hatch, Fig. 28.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The completed nose conversion, Figs. 30, 31.  In this modeler’s opinion, I feel that this method of backdating the Monogram kit is far easier and less prone to error than grafting on the nose section of the Revell B-17F.  The Revell clear nose cone is only good for the Memphis Belle, so that has to be redone.  If you want the best looking windows, you still have to enlarge the openings and replace the kit supplied clear parts.  The Revell plastic is thinner with no interior detail, so in the end, I have to wonder what work some modelers think they are saving by cutting up a Revell kit.  I think these shots are pretty convincing that the Monogram kit, by itself, can be nicely modified.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figures 32 through 34 show a little bit of what was done to the Monogram top turret.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The radio room .50 was on an open mount rather than mounted in Plexiglas as in the “G” model.  This meant creating the structure around the opening as well as the mount.  I began by fabricating the basic structure from styrene, Fig. 35.  The completed radio compartment prior to cementing the fuselage halves together, Fig. 36.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The opening for the radio compartment needed to be refined.  The first step was to cement some additional material around the outline of the opening, Fig. 37.  The hatch opening for the radio compartment has been completed and clear acrylic has been cemented into the forward opening, Fig. 38.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The clear acrylic has been polished out and the wind deflector has been added from brass sheet, Fig. 39.  The mount for the radio .50 was fabricated from brass machinings, Fig 40.  The ends of the cross piece were cut away from the rod stock.  They press fit into the mounting holes in the radio room sides and the .50 mount slid into the holes in the pins.  The finished radio .50 mount, Fig. 41.

The waist window needs to be modified so some additional styrene was added to the top of the opening, Figs. 42, 43.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The early B-17’s had a Plexiglas cover over the sides rather than the exposed support as on the kit turret.  One of the aspects of the model that seems to have generated numerous questions is how I did the ball turret.  Because the kit ball turret is not round, a piece of styrene was added between the two halves to bring it into correct shape, Fig. 44.  The sides of the turret were cut out, Fig. 45.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik Ball Turret
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik Ball Turret

Acrylic rod stock was machined to form the basic shape of the sides.  Six lines were laid out with the aid of an indexing head and a thin circular saw.  The lines were then refined with a fine slotting file, Fig. 46.  Gray paint was flowed into the slots and sealed over with cyanoacrylate cement, Fig. 47.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The cyanoacrylate cement has been sanded smooth and the ends polished.  A mill was run in from the opposite side and a recess was milled for the turret support, Fig. 48.  Gray paint was applied into the interior machined circle and support, Fig. 49.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The assembled ball turret, Fig. 50.  The acrylic rod stock fits into a support that was created in the fuselage.  The masks were cut using a blade mounted in a compass, Fig. 51.

Monogram B17F conversion Budzik Ball Turret
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik ball turret
Monogram B17F conversion Budzik

The masked ball turret, Fig. 52.  The completed ball turret, Fig. 53.  The ball turret in place demonstrating a nice three dimensional effect for the bracing in the turret ends, Fig. 54.