The location of the bilge keels was laid out using the straight edge of an adjustable protractor against the hull, Fig. 1.  As the straight edge is dragged along the hull, it locates where along the curve of the hull that the bilge keel should be located.  A heavy groove was scribed in the hull to mark the position.  Final priming of the hull was done with a dark gray lacquer primer, Fig. 2.  I prefer to use a dark gray primer because it shows defects and contours better than the light gray.

USS Enterprise Bilge Keel Location
USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull

The primer I use is a very basic Dupont automotive product that, unfortunately, has been discontinued long ago, Fig. 3.  Similar products are still available, but are limited in availability by state law.  Application is with an Iwata RG-2, Fig. 4.  It is important to use the right size airbrush for the project.  Despite the size of the model, note how the primer coat is very smooth and consistent, requiring only a minimum of sanding.  This can only be achieved with the application of enough volume of material so as to minimize overspray.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull
Iwata RG-2 Paul Budzik

The armor belt was added with multiple layers of primer/filler, Fig. 5.  In reality the armor belt is 4” thick at the top and tapers to 2” at the bottom.  That translates to only .0114” at the top, tapering to .006” at the bottom (or about two thicknesses of a good quality masking tape at the top and one at the bottom).  The belt was masked off with several thickness of 3M Fineline tape and the primer/filler was applied.  The primer was allowed to sit for a few days to allow the solvents to evaporate.  The belt area was then given an initial sanding using the Fineline tape as a guide.  The tape was removed.  Masking tape was reapplied very near the edge of the primer to act as a guide for the thickness while doing the final finishing.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull

The Maryland Silver book had some good dimensioned drawings of the hawse pipe.  I scaled one of the drawings and then blocked it to get a general idea of how I was going to create the shape.  The green lines show the actual hawse pipe cross section.  I experimented by mounting my first effort in the hull of the Trumpeter Hornet, Fig. 6.  By comparison, the Trumpeter hawse pipe is horribly out of scale and placed too high up on the hull.

Enterprise Hawse Pipe
USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull

My first consideration, for the installation of the hawse pipe, was that it would be mounted in a clean hole that would result in a neat border.  It is very difficult to drill a precise hole this large through layers of different materials.  In addition, the curved surfaces of the hull make alignment difficult.  My solution was to turn and center drill some acrylic rod stock into the shape shown in Fig. 7.  The end was blocked off by cementing a piece of .010” styrene, Fig 8.  A slightly oversized hole was drilled in the hull at the appropriate spot.  A mixture of cyanoacrylate cement and dental resin powder was placed into the hole.  The acrylic turning was positioned in the hole with the aide of a surface gage, Fig. 9.  The lip of the acrylic turning rests against the hull side ensuring that alignment of both hawse pipes would be the same.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull
USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull

The excess acrylic stock was removed and the area around the hole finished down.  The initial machined acrylic rod, used for the hawse pipe, was trial fit into the hole, Fig. 10.  The hawse pipe was shaped and cemented to place, Fig. 11.  A final coat of primer was applied, Fig. 12.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Hull

The rudder is a good example of how to handle a scratchbuilt component.  Two pieces of styrene were glued together.  I ran a felt marker over one of the surfaces prior to gluing so that the centerline would show up well.  The drawing for the rudder was scaled and, with the aide of spray adhesive, stuck to the styrene blank.  The blank was shaped to conform to the drawing.  A hole was drilled, on the centerline of the two layers of styrene, to accept a piece of .047” rod, Fig. 13.  The hole for the rod is 90° to the base and parallel to the after edge of the rudder, Fig. 14.

The position of the rudder was established and a corresponding hole was drilled in the hull.  The hole is 90° to the main deck in both the fore-and-aft and port-to-starboard aspects.  This automatically aligned the rudder.  When seated to place, the lack of space between the rudder and hull provided positive feedback on the hull shape, Fig. 15.  A slot was cut to separate the rudder from the rudder post and the top of the rudder was reduced to separate it from the keel.  The rudder was given a taper from the hinge line to the stem, Fig. 16.

Working off the planes and perpendicular lines previously established, the rudder and post were given their final contours as well as the engraving of the hinge lines, Fig. 17.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik
USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik

The bilge keels were formed from .040” x .100” styrene strip.  The strips need to be tapered.  I jury rigged two steel rulers back-to-back, close to the edge of a piece of glass, Fig. 18.  A red marker provided a good indicator of how the material was removed, Fig. 19.  The bilge keels have been cemented in place, Fig. 20.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik

The scalloping of the hull side was shaped with sandpaper wrapped around rod stock.  The spacer block under the rod and a piece of ABS (gray plastic sheet) provided the guide for the removal of material, Fig. 21.

The general layout lines and measurements for the aft 5” gallery were taken off the scaled Web drawings.  When I first went over the drawings, I must admit that I thought the irregularities were due to “loose” tolerances.  However, examination of the aft galleries as represented on the large Yorktown builders model confirms that the aft galleries were indeed asymmetrical.  The “A” and “B” dimensions are reversed from side to side.  The shorter “A” dimension is forward on the starboard gallery (blue lines) and aft on the port side gallery (gray lines).  The curved portions of the shield have a radius of .031”.  Also, the aft curved section is slightly more outboard than the forward curved section of the shield.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik 5" Gallery
USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik 5" Gallery

The first step in construction of the 5” gallery was to form the curved portion of the shield.  .015” styrene was wrapped around a dowel and held in place with a piece of aluminum sheet and hose clamps, Fig. 22.  This was placed in a toaster oven at 250° for 8 minutes.  Masking tape was used to hold the formed styrene around the dowel.  The dowel was mounted in the lathe and a blade was used to section off pieces of the formed styrene, Fig. 23.  In order to maintain their shape during the next steps, the pieces of curved styrene were cemented to scrap styrene sheet, Fig. 24.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik 5" Gallery

I used a saw blade mounted in the mill to remove the excess curved material and provide a 90° cut, Fig. 24.  The curved pieces were cemented to a strip of .015” styrene, Fig. 25.  The styrene strip was taped to a steel straight edge and a spacer was used to maintain the distance between the two curved portions.  The styrene was removed from the top of the curved sections as well as the excess strip material.  The completed shield was cemented to the deck and the excess deck material was trimmed flush with the shield, Fig. 27.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik 5" Gallery

The ribs on the shielding were added with .010” x .020” styrene strips.  A piece of square stainless steel wire in a block of wood served as a guide to keep the ribbing vertical, Fig. 28.  The height of the outermost ribs needed to be reduced because their appearance is very subtle.  Masking tape was placed between the ribs to act as a guide when sanding, Fig. 29.  The aft gallery deck was cemented in place and the general structure boxed in, Fig. 30.  The actual height will be determined later.

USS Enterprise 1/350 Paul Budzik 5" Gallery

Before doing some final priming, I needed to add a few additional details.  There is an open doorway out the side of the after hanger deck.  A piece of .005” styrene was cut to shape and cemented in place, Fig. 31.  The aft hull was given a final coat of primer.  The doorway was opened and the raised plating detail was added, Fig. 32.

The forecastle structure containing the officers quarters was made from sheet styrene cemented around a basswood form.  The forward 5” gallery structure was made from sheet styrene using the same method as outlined above, Figs. 34, 35.

The bow chocks were turned from brass rod and finished down after being cemented in place, Figs. 32 – 34.